Arlington halts distribution of Johnson and Johnson’s vaccine at AT&T Stadium

Arlington halted the distribution of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccines at AT&T Stadium as the FDA and CDC recommended a nationwide pause after rare cases of blood clots. 

Arlington halted the distribution of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccines at AT&T Stadium on Tuesday after the Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention rec­om­mended a nationwide pause in or­der to in­ves­ti­gate rare cases of blood clots.  

The FDA and CDC paused the vaccine “out of an abundance of caution” after six cases were reported of severe blood clots after the shot, according to a joint press release.

All six cases occurred among women between the ages of 18 and 48, and the symptoms occurred six to 13 days after vaccination.

As of Monday, more than 6.8 million doses of the Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine had been administered across the country, according to the release.

Of the more than 500,000 doses administered in Texas, none of the six blood clot cases occurred in the state, said Lt. Richard Fegan, Arlington Fire Department public information officer.

Fegan said if someone who has received the vaccine experiences abnormal pain or reactions, regardless of if they fit the description of the reported cases, they should seek medical attention.

The CDC will review these cases and assess their potential significance on Wednesday, according to the release. The FDA will review that analysis as it also investigates the cases.

All appointments canceled by the pause on Johnson & Johnson’s vaccines will be rescheduled in the next few days, Fegan said.

Residents will be notified when they are rescheduled, and no further action is necessary on their part. 

Residents needing a second shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine can still get their dose at the stadium.

Fegan said people seeking their first dose of the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine can sign up through the Tarrant County website, and there’s not a long wait to get a vaccination appointment.

@ColeKembel

@ByDavidSilvaR

news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu 

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